Hi there, I'm Amanda - USC Undergrad, feminist and ally, atheist+, everlasting GOP-stopper, vegetarian, math and science enthusiast, and actress. I have a bit of a dark sense of humor and I can be really sarcastic, but I'm actually just a big softy, don't worry. You just have to wade your way through these snark-infested waters. (INTJ.)

(formerly thefriendlessfeminist and thepandaspensieve)


I (rarely) make low-quality YouTube videos on feminism and science and atheism and stuff.


I'm a bit like Stargirl, but sassier and sort of obnoxious.



I put on my magical feminist party hat and never took it off.



Leslie Knope is my patronus.

♀ FOLLOWING ♀

antiquelullaby:

Psyche (detail) - Kendall William Sargeant

antiquelullaby:

Psyche (detail) - Kendall William Sargeant

(Source: summerlilac, via cinderellassilverboots)

astrofemme:

lowbrasschikah:

I thought this was so nice

GIRLS BEING NICE TO OTHER GIRLS

astrofemme:

lowbrasschikah:

I thought this was so nice

GIRLS BEING NICE TO OTHER GIRLS

(via littlecatlady)

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

(via harrypotterconfessions)

Orange Is The New Black - Preliminary Book Review

Has anyone else read the original memoir that Orange Is The New Black is based on?   Because I’m almost 100 pages in, and is it just me, or is it kind of…boring?

I don’t mean it’s devoid of the raunchy lesbian sex scenes and melodrama the show boasts of, but rather the deep and meaningful look into the characters’s lives that the show provides.  The show contains complex, interesting and distinct women with rich lives and memorable personalities.  Largely due to Kerman’s style, I feel like I barely know these women she’s doing time with.  Granted, she’s still fairly new to the prison at this point in the book, but her descriptions of her interactions with the other prisoners are vague and impersonal, and even later as she describes their personalities in more detail, it’s a very tell, not show, style, with no specifics.  She also comments on the cost and futility of the prison system and its acts of locking up women who present little danger to the public (mostly as accomplices on drug charges), but she doesn’t really go into detail or SHOW how this system is corrupt and detrimental?  She mentions her affluent upbringing and the privileges it grants her, but doesn’t explore how our society forces people in poverty into illegal circumstances, and disproportionately targets them - and if she doesn’t truly and meaningfully address the problem, it makes it very hard to elicit solutions.  Piper Kerman has mentioned before how lucky and rare she is for getting to tell her story, but it seems all the more remarkable given how her story is told.  I feel like there must be incredible, interesting, and heartbreaking characters simmering under the surface, but they’re glossed over in favor of banal narration of how many books Piper received and her casual racism.  At this point, the worst treatment Piper has faced has been missing breakfast on a day she woke up late, and seeing bugs in the bathroom - unpleasant, to be sure, but hardly remarkable, and her style of writing makes it hard to connect to and really empathize with.

I think my main point is that the show isn’t merely provocative, it’s evocative - a very important distinction.  We deeply feel for the women and the circumstances that led to their incarceration, and see firsthand the abuse they face.  It moves us to care and seek reform.  We don’t watch the show simply because it has sexy lesbians, gory fistfights, and scandalous one-liners.  We watch because we’re fascinated by the relatability of these women, and the horror and humiliation they face, while managing to maintain their personalities and humor and forge meaningful friendships.  At least so far in the book, this element of the story has barely scratched the surface, and that’s a pity.

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

(Source: skulls-and-tea, via cunafish)

slavocracy:

sorry white people but if you dont support mike brown & the people of fergusons’ protests in 2014 you probably wouldnt have supported abolition in the 1800s or civil rights movements in the 1960s & having the ability to recognize something as morally justified in hindsight something that has already been accepted by the mainstream as morally justified is nice for u but on all practical levels useless to everyone else 

(Source: cabbagefuneral, via radsadnsassy)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters canvass the neighborhood of County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch.


Saturday, August 30th.

(via sassyladythegeek)

jennli123:

I redid it in color. Black children are denied their innocence and childhood, even in death.

jennli123:

I redid it in color. Black children are denied their innocence and childhood, even in death.

(via smizmarr)

tytnetwork:

"I engaged my father in long discussions after dinner, trying to reconcile our imprisonment during the war and all the ideals that I’d been reading about. My father said to me, ‘Our democracy is a people’s democracy. It can be as great as a people can be, but it’s also as fallible as people are. And our democracy is vitally dependent on good people being actively engaged in the process.’"

Throwback: Ana Kasparian interviewed actor and activist George Takei and discussed how spending early parts of his life in a US internment camp motivated him to stay engaged in politics. 

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

guiltyhipster:

Girls get mocked for liking high heels and lipstick. Girls get mocked for liking sports. Girls get mocked for liking tea and books. Girls get mocked for liking comics books and video games. Girls get mocked for liking math and science. Girls get mocked for liking boys. Girls get mocked for liking girls. Girls get mocked for liking both. What the fuck are we supposed to like? Water? Air? Come on, tell me. I’m dying to know. 

(via duhhhria)

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